FEMA
     

FEMA

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4.75 M

Subscribers

18.15 K

Joining Date:
2006-03-05

Views

3.80 M

Followers

409.53 K

Uploads

163

V30:
378.69 K

ER30:
11x

Followers

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Education

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FEMA Federal Emergency Management Agency Facebook Page Statistics

Total Views

3.80 M

Videos

163

Average Views/Video

23,332


Videos
  • In our most recent #PrepTalks video, Dr. Sheri Fink shares two stories from Hurricanes Katrina and Harvey that show how the prioritization of limited resources during disasters can be a matter of life or death. 

“How we allocate the resources that we have in disasters; how we choose who gets the resources … is going to affect the outcome,” Dr. Fink says.

Watch here and find more information at fema.gov/preptalks/fink.

More PrepTalks will be released in coming months. PrepTalks are possible through our partnership with the International Association of Emergency Managers, the National Emergency Management Association, the National Homeland Security Consortium, and the Naval Postgraduate School Center for Homeland Security.

      

  • When Hurricane Michael made landfall on the Florida Panhandle, the strength and structural integrity of thousands of homes were tested by the storm’s Category 4 winds. Habitat for Humanity used higher construction standards when it built these five homes in the Panhandle, helping them weather the storm. 

This week, David I. Maurstad, our Deputy Associate Administrator for Insurance & Mitigation traveled to the Florida to meet with survivors and FEMA staff working to help them. “This is proof that mitigation works and it doesn’t have to cost a lot of money,” said Maurstad. “As we begin rebuilding, we have a chance to build in ways that will make Florida stronger and safer.” See the houses that stood up to Michael:

      

  • It’s important to stay alert to possible scammers after a disaster. Here are some common scams and ways to identify them:

1⃣  Imposters posing as housing inspectors. 
All FEMA inspectors will ALWAYS carry an official ID badge and they will NEVER ask you for your nine-digit registration number, banking or other personal information. They will already have your registration number.

2⃣  Fake offers of local or federal aid.
Federal and local disaster workers will never ask for or accept money. FEMA and U.S. Small Business Administration staff never charge money when helping you apply for assistance or inspecting your home and will not make promises.

3⃣ Fraudulent building contractors. 
Only use licensed or verified local contractors backed by reliable references. Demand that contractors put down the details of the job in writing and check with the Attorney General’s Office to see if there are complaints against the company or contractor. 

Here’s how to report fraud or scams:
☑️ Call the National Center for Disaster Fraud Hotline at 866-720-5721.
☑️ Email disaster@leo.gov.
☑️ Call 800-621-3362 (TTY 800-462-7585) if you suspect fraud related to FEMA or your disaster assistance application.

      

  • Answering Yes to the Disability Question When Registering for Assistance

      

  • Returning Home Safely After a Disaster

      

  • FEMA Hurricane Michael Update 10/12/2018

      

  • Tips on How to Return Home Safely after a Disaster

      

  • FEMA Hurricane Michael Update 10/11/2018

      

  • FEMA Hurricane Michael Update 10/10/2018

      

  • FEMA Hurricane Michael Update 10/9/2018

      

  • 10/3/18 Wireless Emergency Alert test

      

  • North and South Carolina: Once it’s safe to return home, call your insurance agent to start a claim for damage due to Florence. Then begin the cleanup and recovery process right away.

Take these steps to document your flood damage:

☑️Take photos of damaged items
☑️Take photos of appliance make, model, and serial numbers
☑️Collect swatches of damaged items
☑️Dispose of flood-damaged materials

Learn more about submitting your flood claim: fema.gov/nfip-file-your-claim

      

In our most recent #PrepTalks video, Dr. Sheri Fink shares two stories from Hurricanes Katrina and Harvey that show how the prioritization of limited resources during disasters can be a matter of life or death. “How we allocate the resources that we have in disasters; how we choose who gets the resources … is going to affect the outcome,” Dr. Fink says. Watch here and find more information at fema.gov/preptalks/fink. More PrepTalks will be released in coming months. PrepTalks are possible through our partnership with the International Association of Emergency Managers, the National Emergency Management Association, the National Homeland Security Consortium, and the Naval Postgraduate School Center for Homeland Security.

 

 

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2018-11-08

The above data represents video analysis and stats of FEMA Federal Emergency Management Agency Facebook page