FEMA
     

FEMA

Views

4.59 M

Subscribers

17.70 K

Joining Date:
2006-03-05

Views

3.80 M

Followers

385.08 K

Uploads

163

V30:
97

ER30:
2x

Followers

700.48 K

Country

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Category

Education

Profile Type

Creator

FEMA Federal Emergency Management Agency Facebook Page Statistics

Total Views

3.80 M

Videos

163

Average Views/Video

23,332


Videos
  • Responding to a storm like Hurricane Florence takes teamwork at all levels. It starts with neighbors helping neighbors, which is where voluntary organizations come in.

Voluntary organizations help provide for immediate needs like food, water, and shelter, while local/state officials and federal agencies coordinate restoring critical services like fuel, transportation, and communications. 

As people return home and start their recovery, volunteers will also be on hand to help with clean-up and other needs. This community spirit is an integral part of any disaster response.

To find out how you can help, go to nvoad.org to register and with a group. Never go on your own to the disaster area!

      

  • We are live with our federal partners providing an update on Hurricane Florence. Live captions are available at www.captionedtext.com/client/event.aspx?EventID=3760605

      

  • We are live with our federal partners providing an update on Hurricane Florence. Live captions are available at www.captionedtext.com/client/event.aspx?EventID=3758042

      

  • Today, people in the Carolinas and Virginia will start to feel the effects of Hurricane Florence. The biggest threat from the storm is the deadly storm surge on the coast, so anyone in a mandatory evacuation zone must get out as soon as possible. 

Local and state officials are sharing critical updates on social media – follow South Carolina Emergency Management Division, NC Emergency Management, and Virginia Department of Emergency Management

Don’t base assumptions about the severity of Hurricane Florence on the wind speed category. Flooding is the biggest cause of death during hurricanes, and Florence will slow down as it approaches the coast. Extreme amounts of rainfall is expected far inland, leading to flash flooding and river flooding. Get ready by making sure you have multiple ways to get local weather alerts (TV, radio, phone).

      

  • We are live with our federal partners providing an update on Hurricane Florence. Live captions are available at www.captionedtext.com/client/event.aspx?EventID=3758040

      

  • Update 9/11/2018 1200 EDT: The entire video of this press conference is available at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o1UO9h-JQMQ. Closed captions are available. Due to technical difficulties, we were unable to fully stream the conference live on Facebook. 

We are live with Associate Administrator for Response and Recovery Jeff Byard, and our federal partners providing an update on Hurricane Florence. Live captions available at www.fedrcc.us//Enter.aspx?EventID=3758038

      

  • The earliest effects of Hurricane #Florence are about a day away, meaning that anyone in the path of the storm should finish preparations tomorrow (Wednesday). Currently, the entire coast of North Carolina and parts of the northern South Carolina coast are under storm surge watches and warnings. Please evacuate immediately if told to by local officials. 

Storm surge is not the only water-related threat from Florence. Severe inland and river flooding is also expected, so it's critical to monitor weather alerts for your area so you can stay aware.  Remember: never walk, swim, or drive through floodwaters. 

You can sign up for weather alerts for up to 5 locations with the FEMA app: fema.gov/mobile-app. Follow your local U.S. National Weather Service (NWS) office as well for localized weather updates.

      

  • Since Hurricane Irma, $964 million has been paid out to survivors through the National Flood Insurance Program. Here, retired U.S. Army Sergeant Gary Boggs shares how purchasing flood insurance to safeguard his biggest asset—a rental property in Jacksonville, FL—helped his family to recover. 

Find out more about getting flood insurance at floodsmart.gov.

      

  • Out of the variety of grants that we provide to communities, hazard mitigation provides one of the clearest examples of how pre-disaster efforts can protect priceless cultural institutions. The over 100 year-old Vizcaya Museum and Gardens in Miami, Florida, has survived several hurricanes. In 2012, the museum used a mitigation grant to replace a large glass canopy that helped prevent damage on the art displayed in an outside courtyard. This work helped protect all of the art from destruction during Hurricane Irma. For more on hazard mitigation assistance, visit fema.gov/hazard-mitigation-assistance.

      

  • As Hurricane Lane impacts Hawaii, here are some key safety tips to share with friends & family in the area.

      

  • We are live with Administrator Brock Long and our federal partners providing an update on Hurricane Lane in Hawaii. Live captions available at www.fedrcc.us//Enter.aspx?EventID=3732173

      

  • We are live with Administrator Brock Long and our federal partners providing an update on Hurricane Lane in Hawaii. Live captions available at www.fedrcc.us//Enter.aspx?EventID=3731759

      

Responding to a storm like Hurricane Florence takes teamwork at all levels. It starts with neighbors helping neighbors, which is where voluntary organizations come in. Voluntary organizations help provide for immediate needs like food, water, and shelter, while local/state officials and federal agencies coordinate restoring critical services like fuel, transportation, and communications. As people return home and start their recovery, volunteers will also be on hand to help with clean-up and other needs. This community spirit is an integral part of any disaster response. To find out how you can help, go to nvoad.org to register and with a group. Never go on your own to the disaster area!

 

 

Upload

2018-09-18

The above data represents video analysis and stats of FEMA Federal Emergency Management Agency Facebook page