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NASA Goddard

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NASA Goddard Facebook Page Statistics

Total Views

5.89 M

Videos

310

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Videos
  • What happens when a 2,000-mile-across smoke layer meets a cloud bank? NASA’s Observations of Aerosols Above Clouds and their Interactions (ORACLES) team returns to Africa for a third time this October to learn more about the effects of these interactions on Earth’s climate.
 
When smoke is above the dark ocean and looks lighter in comparison, it reflects sunlight and causes a cooling effect. When smoke is above clouds and appears darker, it instead absorbs sunlight, causing a warming effect. Understanding how clouds and smoke cooperate to determine a balance between climate warming and cooling is at the heart of the ORACLES mission.
 
Read more via NASA Earth: https://go.nasa.gov/2IU0V11

      

  • The Arctic sea ice cover is the thinnest and youngest it’s been in 60 years. NASA scientists used combined records of Arctic sea ice thickness from satellites and submarine sonar data.

Approximately 70 percent of Arctic sea ice is now seasonal instead of perennial, meaning it melts in the summer rather than lasting from year to year. Because thinner ice breaks up easier, it’s also more susceptible to weather and wind conditions. With NASA Earth:  https://go.nasa.gov/2QEtSR6

      

  • Landfall of Hurricane Michael from Space

Cameras outside the International Space Station captured views of Hurricane Michael at 12:58 p.m. EDT Oct. 10 from an altitude of 255 miles as the storm made landfall as a category 4 hurricane over the Florida panhandle. 

The National Hurricane Center reported maximum sustained winds near 150 mph with the potential to bring dangerous storm surge and heavy rains to the Florida panhandle area.

More photos: https://flic.kr/s/aHskFZo6QR

Credit NASA

      

  • Pulsars are the most powerful magnets in the universe. A new simulation -- a “pulsar in a box” -- is giving scientists insights into the extreme physics of these spinning neutron stars. 

The simulation shows that most of the electrons (blue, with lighter shades representing higher energies) tend to race outward from the magnetic poles. But some medium-energy electrons scatter wildly, even heading back to the pulsar. The positrons (red) mostly flow out at lower latitudes, forming a relatively thin structure called the current sheet. In fact, the highest-energy positrons here -- less than 0.1 percent of the total -- are capable of producing gamma rays similar to those detected by NASA's Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, which has discovered 216 gamma-ray pulsars.

The simulation ran on the Discover supercomputer at NASA's Center for Climate Simulation at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland, and the Pleiades supercomputer at NASA's Ames Research Center in Silicon Valley, California. The model actually tracks "macroparticles," each of which represents many trillions of electrons or positrons.   

Read more: https://go.nasa.gov/2pKC0UT

      

  • Cameras outside the International Space Station captured views of Hurricane Michael at 12:13 p.m. and 12:50 p.m. EDT Oct. 9 from an altitude of 255 miles as the storm churned over the Gulf of Mexico moving northwest at 12 miles an hour. Michael is expected to make landfall Wednesday, Oct. 10 as a category 3 hurricane over the Florida panhandle.

Credit: NASA

      

  • NASA unveils a sustainable campaign to return to the Moon and then to Mars. Work is underway in NASA Solar System Exploration on human and robotic missions to expand the frontiers of human experience and scientific discovery. https://go.nasa.gov/2DxsdeD

      

  • Time flies when you’re a space telescope doing important science for the universe! NASA's Hubble Space Telescope has been around for 28 years of NASA’s 60-year history, and a myriad of its key moments have been documented on video.  

Lift off with Hubble for its launch and deployment in 1990. Watch our scientists react as Comet Shoemaker-Levy 9 impacts Jupiter in 1994. See our astronauts in action during Hubble’s final servicing mission in 2009. 

You can relive all of these great moments -- and more -- through our ongoing collection of archival footage. https://go.nasa.gov/2xZ707Z

      

  • Parker Solar Probe completed its first flyby of Venus on Oct. 3, 2018, during a Venus gravity assist. The spacecraft used the planet's gravity to alter its trajectory and bring it closer to the Sun. 

Read more: https://go.nasa.gov/2Nml28H

      

  • Dive inside a hurricane in 3D with this 360-degree visualization of 2017’s #HurricaneMaria, created by the NASA-Japan Global Precipitation Measurement Core Observatory satellite. This video reveals the structure inside the storm on Sept. 18, 2017, as it began intensifying to a deadly category 5 hurricane within 24 hours. 🌀

Green and yellow dots represent low rates of rainfall, while red and magenta dots represent high rates. At the top of the hurricane, blue and purple dots represent frozen precipitation. As the visualization continues, the dots transform into numbers, which are the observed millimeters of precipitation that fall per hour. The end of the video depicts precipitation particle sizes: big drops are in dark blue and small drops are in light blue and white.

Learn more about the video here (via Precipitation Measurement Missions and NASA Earth): https://go.nasa.gov/2y2JiI4

      

  • Dive inside a hurricane in 3D with this 360-degree visualization of 2017’s #HurricaneMaria, created by the NASA-Japan Global Precipitation Measurement Core Observatory satellite. This video reveals the structure inside the storm on Sept. 18, 2017, as it began intensifying to a deadly category 5 hurricane within 24 hours. 🌀

Green and yellow dots represent low rates of rainfall, while red and magenta dots represent high rates. At the top of the hurricane, blue and purple dots represent frozen precipitation. As the visualization continues, the dots transform into numbers, which are the observed millimeters of precipitation that fall per hour. The end of the video depicts precipitation particle sizes: big drops are in dark blue and small drops are in light blue and white.

Learn more about the video here (via Precipitation Measurement Missions and NASA Earth): https://go.nasa.gov/2xZ3r1M

      

  • A pair of Columbia University astronomers using NASA's Hubble Space Telescope and Kepler and K2 Missions  assembled compelling evidence for the existence of a massive moon orbiting a gas-giant planet located 4,000 light-years away. 

Read more: https://go.nasa.gov/2DVsdW0

      

  • It’s the room where it happens! Look around the missions operations center of NASA's Hubble Space Telescope with this immersive, 360-degree virtual tour. 

Start in the lobby, then move inside to see how our flight operators monitor Hubble and investigate space anomalies with the support team. Finally, move down the hall to see the hardware and tools we’ve flown into space.

Experience what it’s like working for one of our most exciting missions: https://go.nasa.gov/2DRTjNT

      

What happens when a 2,000-mile-across smoke layer meets a cloud bank? NASA’s Observations of Aerosols Above Clouds and their Interactions (ORACLES) team returns to Africa for a third time this October to learn more about the effects of these interactions on Earth’s climate. When smoke is above the dark ocean and looks lighter in comparison, it reflects sunlight and causes a cooling effect. When smoke is above clouds and appears darker, it instead absorbs sunlight, causing a warming effect. Understanding how clouds and smoke cooperate to determine a balance between climate warming and cooling is at the heart of the ORACLES mission. Read more via NASA Earth: https://go.nasa.gov/2IU0V11

 

 

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2018-10-12

The above data represents video analysis and stats of NASA Goddard Facebook page