American Museum of Natural History
     

American Museum of Natural History

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American Museum of Natural History Facebook Page Statistics

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Videos
  • Behold, the giant isopod (Bathynomus giganteus)! A crustacean of the deep sea, the giant isopod lurks on the seafloor at depths of up to 2,140 meters (7,020 feet) in both Atlantic and Pacific waters. It can reach as long as 30 centimeters (nearly 1 foot), and it has 7 pairs of legs! If it looks somewhat familiar it’s because it’s a relative of some terrestrial crustaceans, such as the pill bug (or roly-poly) and woodlouse. A couple of its better-known relatives are the shrimp and the crab. Wondering what this critter eats? Pretty much anything that falls from above, including whale carcasses.

      

  • What do crocodiles and leopards have in common? Century-old specimens of both are helping to decode the biodiversity of ecosystems  under threat today.

      

  • We're LIVE with Mammalogy Curator Ross MacPhee talking about megafauna. Post your questions in the comments!!

      

  • For today's Megafauna Monday, we're getting our fossil mammals looking good for the new year! Tell us where you're watching from in the comments!

      

  • What Sluggish Sloths Tell Us About Balance

      

  • Silent Tour of the Origami Holiday Tree

      

  • Earthrise Visualization

      

  • Learn to fold a colorful fish and a fluttering butterfly.

      

  • Whales and sailboats: origami folding lesson

      

  • Light takes time to travel from stars and distant galaxies to observers here on Earth. How much have the stars changed since first emitting the light that we see tonight? How far back in time are we seeing when we look at the night sky?

      

  • Ros teaches us to make a talking fish!

      

  • How Caribou Spot Food in Snow

      

Behold, the giant isopod (Bathynomus giganteus)! A crustacean of the deep sea, the giant isopod lurks on the seafloor at depths of up to 2,140 meters (7,020 feet) in both Atlantic and Pacific waters. It can reach as long as 30 centimeters (nearly 1 foot), and it has 7 pairs of legs! If it looks somewhat familiar it’s because it’s a relative of some terrestrial crustaceans, such as the pill bug (or roly-poly) and woodlouse. A couple of its better-known relatives are the shrimp and the crab. Wondering what this critter eats? Pretty much anything that falls from above, including whale carcasses.

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2019-01-15

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