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tbonepearson

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  • How to do a free screen capture video: Windows 10
It’s not on the list of headline features, but the latest version of Windows is hiding a very welcome and well-executed feature: a video-capture tool baked right into the operating system.

On previous versions of Windows, recording a video of your screen meant navigating the usual muddy creek of ad-infested freeware; the lack of integration also made setting up a keyboard command to start recording an exercise in frustration.
That’s all changed with Windows 10, thanks to a video-record feature baked into the new Game DVR. Press Win+G, and a small bar pops up, with a video-capture button, and links to the Game DVR hub. (The first time you do this in a particular program, Windows will ask you to confirm that the program is a game, before starting Game DVR.)
Hit record (or Win+Alt+R), and it will automatically start capturing video from the program you’ve got open, rather than the entire screen. It’s a feature aimed at gamers (duh) who want to share in-game clips, but it works equally well for sending your grandma a how-to video on using Google.

Even better for gamers: if you enable background recording, Game DVR will constantly record the last 30 seconds of activity in the background when you’re playing a game. If something cool happens, hit Win+Alt+G, and it will save that 30-second snippet.

Also of mention is the new screen capture: Alt+Win+Print Screen now saves a screenshot of a window to the same folder. That might sound like a minor improvement, but it’s a thousand times better than pasting Print-Screens into Paint like the XPers of yore, and even better than the Snipping Tool that ships on more recent versions of Windows.

      

  • Behind the Scenes: Editing Spellfury (Spoilers!)
https://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B0791WFGG2
The season 2 spellfury link above takes you to amazon's prime page with all the latest episodes.
I'm working on the latest episode of Spellfury (fantasy webseries), I'm using adobe's premiere pro and after effects. It's going to take me a while to edit and do the VFX's so I thought I'd show you the behind the scenes work I'm up to. In this episode we see Druinia and Xorn make their way into the medieval town of Full River. We had fun going to conventions with the actors dressed up as they're characters (in costume) surrounded by cosplay people back in the day.

      

  • SIMPSONS Arcade Game FINISHED!!!
The Simpsons arcade game was produced by Konami in 1991. It was released in North America on March 4, 1991 and in Japan on August 4, 1991. 
The Simpsons is a side-scrolling beat 'em up for up to four players, with each one playing as a member of the Simpsons family; Marge, who swings her vacuum cleaner, Homer, who punches and kicks, Bart, who wields his skateboard, and Lisa, who attacks with a jump rope. Along with the standard array of jumping and attacking, two players can combine together to form a joint attack, which differs depending on which characters are used. For example, Homer can lift Bart up to use him as a melee weapon, whilst teaming him up with Marge puts them into a powerful cartwheel attack. Players can also pick up food items to restore health, as well as objects they can throw at enemies and power-ups that temporarily give them better attacks. Players are given a small number of lives, which are lost if the player's life bar runs out. If the player runs out of life with no lives remaining (represented by a Bart-like devil appearing before them), their game ends, though they may continue by adding credits. The Japanese version of the game included small scale nuclear bombs that, when thrown, clear all on-screen enemies, as well as a life bar that can be doubled by eating food when your character's health was full. At certain points in the game, players compete against each other in button-bashing minigames to earn additional points (computer controlled characters replace characters not being played by humans).
Legacy
The game began development in February 1990 and underwent location testing in the Chicago, Illinois area (where the Konami's U.S. subsidiary was located) in December of the same year, a few months before its full release. The Japanese game developer had prior success with the 4-player Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles arcade game and attempted to reproduce the same success with a game based on The Simpsons.

Conversions of the game were released for MS-DOS and Commodore 64 in 1991, both developed by Novotrade. Backbone Entertainment would later released an emulated version for the Xbox 360 and PlayStation 3 on February 2012 as a digital download. However, Konami only reacquired the license temporarily and the digital versions on both platforms were discontinued in 2014.

      

  • FREE BONUS: Wizard Fire Arcade FUN!!
Overview
Wizard Fire (known as Dark Seal II in Japan) is a brawler originally developed and published by Data East Corporation for Arcades.

In 2010 the game was ported to the Zeebo by Onan Games and published by G-mode.

Story
In the year 355 A.D. all was safe in the Empire of Gaul until a great evil rose to challenge the four heroes chosen by prophecy to protect their empire. Now, they must slay a dark sorcerer's minions before their ultimate plan of reaching the Dragon Shrine comes to fruition and their army of undead soldiers multiplies.

Gameplay
The class types to choose from are wizard, bard, knight, elf or dwarf. Each of the heroes has a unique standard attack, access to magic and one passive ability. The wizard does maximum magic damage, the bard is resistant to poison, the knight is immune to disease, the elf has increased mobility and the dwarf is resistant to confusion. Unlike the previous game, magic attacks are not unique to each class, though specific characters have a higher chance of using certain attacks. There is also the chance, for any class except the wizard, that the spell will fail and you will transform into a pig for a short time.

History
Wizard Fire was released in the US as such, although it is a direct sequel to Gate of Doom and Data East archives still refer to the game as Gate of Doom II. The series is known as Dark Seal in Japan.

      

  • ARCADE FUN: Zwackery, Zaxxon and Wonder MOMO!!
Ok on this episode of ARCADE FUN we play Zwackery, Zaxxon and Wonder MOMO!!
Wonder Momo (ワンダーモモ Wandā Momo) is a 1987 beat 'em up arcade game that was developed and published by Namco exclusively in Japan. It was the company's last 8-bit arcade game (and the last that ran upon their System 86 hardware), and was ported to the PC-Engine in 1989, with both versions of the game later ported to the Wii Virtual Console. The game was also included in Namco Museum Encore for the Sony PlayStation and mobile on June 2005. Wonder Momo inspired a webcomic series in 2012, an anime miniseries in February 2014, and a sequel game by WayForward Technologies in May 2014.Zwackery is a platform arcade game that had been released by Bally Midway in 1984; it was the first game to run on that company's then-new MCR-68 hardware (two Motorola 68000s running at 7.7238 and 8 MHz, with a DAC for sound). The player must use a 4-way joystick, a rotary controller and four buttons to take control of a wizard named Zachary "Zack" Thwacker who is on a mission to restore a frog princess (who, despite being female, looks like Mr. Toad from The Wind in the Willows), back to her human form (however, because this game does not have an ending, this is impossible) - and his medieval world is made up of several different screens that are traversed by going through doors on one side of the screen, and coming out of another one upon the other side. Zack can collect several items if you push the rotary controller down when he is standing behind them; as well as point items (such as apples and their cores), there are keys (which unlock gates) and spell items (the Bouncing Boots for Super Jump Spell, Flame Sword for Fire Sword Spell, Invisibility Potion for Invisible Spell, Magic Flutes for Raise Rope Spell, and Dragon's Egg for Dragon's Egg Spell). 
Zaxxon (ザクソン) is a 1982 isometric shooter arcade game, developed and released by Sega, in which the player pilots a ship through heavily defended space fortresses. Some sources[13][14][15] claim that Japanese electronics company Ikegami Tsushinki also worked on the development of the game.

Zaxxon was the first game to employ axonometric projection, which lent its name to the game (AXXON from AXONometric projection). The type of axonometric projection is isometric projection: this effect simulated three dimensions from a third-person viewpoint. It was also the first arcade game to be advertised on television,[16] with a commercial produced by Paramount Pictures for $150,000.[17]

The world record on Zaxxon is 4,680,740 points scored by Vernon Kalanikaus of Lā'ie, Hawai'i, on March 15, 1982, according to the Twin Galaxies Intergalactic Scoreboard

      

  • ARCADE FUN: Sunset Riders! COWBOY shoot em up!!!
A side-scrolling Shoot 'em Up released for the arcades in 1991, Sunset Riders is one of several four-player arcade games that Konami released in the wake of their success with Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles: The Arcade Game. The game centers around four bounty hunters (Steve, Bob, Billy, and Cormano) who must hunt down various fugitives during the Wild West to collect monetary rewards. Essentially a Wild West-themed version of Contra, as its director Hideyuki Tsujimoto worked on both arcade Contra games.

Sunset Riders was ported to both the Sega Genesis and the Super Nintendo Entertainment System, in 1993.

      

  • ARCADE FUN: Crazy Climber and Cadillacs and Dinosaurs!! As requested by Gregorythegr8ster, i play crazy climber (and we play crazy climber 2) very poorly and then I switch to Cadillacs and dinosaurs, some great arcade action. Thank goodness I don't have to put real quarters in our I'd have a hard time paying my rent. I use a sumosys 700 with a elgato hd to record the video.
CRAZY CLIMBER is an action game for arcade game produced by Nichibutsu in 1980.  

Players control the right hand and left hand of the twin lever to overcome various obstacles and climb to the top of the skyscraper.
The game was released in several different cabinet styles. Taito licensed the game from Nichibutsu and released it in the US in a generic orange "Taito" cabinet with Americanized artwork. A cabaret version of the game was also created.
Nichibutsu's standard cabinet was shaped similar to the Taito cabinet, but it had a plain white exterior with the Crazy Climber logo from the marquee on the kickplate and diagonally on the sides. The marquee and monitor bezel art are very vibrant, using many custom flourescent colors. The control panel is black painted metal with artwork painted on in orange, white and red. The marquee had no backlighting.

Nichibutsu's deluxe cabinet was taller and had a very unusual control panel. The panel attached to the front of the cabinet seperately and was metal covered with a curved piece of plexiglass. Full color artwork of the climber scaling the outside of a building is silkscreened onto the curved plexi. The instruction sheet was moved from its position on the standard cabinet's monitor bezel to a window on the control panel. The deluxe cabinet also used several Nintendo parts, including the same type monitor Sanyo 20EZ and the same style of coin mechs used by games like Donkey Kong, Donkey Kong Junior, et. al.
Cadillacs and Dinosaurs, released in Japan as Cadillacs Kyouryuu Shinseiki (キャディラックス 恐竜新世紀 Kyadirakkusu Kyōryū Shinseki), is a 1993 arcade game by Capcom. It is a side-scrolling beat 'em up based on the comic book series Xenozoic Tales. The game was produced as a tie-in to the short-lived Cadillacs and Dinosaurs animated series which was aired during the same year the game was released.

      

  • BUTCHER: A Life Behind The Knife

      

  • Tbonepearson

      

How to do a free screen capture video: Windows 10 It’s not on the list of headline features, but the latest version of Windows is hiding a very welcome and well-executed feature: a video-capture tool baked right into the operating system. On previous versions of Windows, recording a video of your screen meant navigating the usual muddy creek of ad-infested freeware; the lack of integration also made setting up a keyboard command to start recording an exercise in frustration. That’s all changed with Windows 10, thanks to a video-record feature baked into the new Game DVR. Press Win+G, and a small bar pops up, with a video-capture button, and links to the Game DVR hub. (The first time you do this in a particular program, Windows will ask you to confirm that the program is a game, before starting Game DVR.) Hit record (or Win+Alt+R), and it will automatically start capturing video from the program you’ve got open, rather than the entire screen. It’s a feature aimed at gamers (duh) who want to share in-game clips, but it works equally well for sending your grandma a how-to video on using Google. Even better for gamers: if you enable background recording, Game DVR will constantly record the last 30 seconds of activity in the background when you’re playing a game. If something cool happens, hit Win+Alt+G, and it will save that 30-second snippet. Also of mention is the new screen capture: Alt+Win+Print Screen now saves a screenshot of a window to the same folder. That might sound like a minor improvement, but it’s a thousand times better than pasting Print-Screens into Paint like the XPers of yore, and even better than the Snipping Tool that ships on more recent versions of Windows.

 

 

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2018-11-15

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