WIRED
     

WIRED

Views

1.54 B

Subscribers

5.24 M

Joining Date:
2005-09-23

Views

376.64 M

Followers

3.00 M

Uploads

2407

V30:
6.37 M

ER30:
_ _

Followers

10.40 M

Followers

1.22 M

Views

9.76 M

Country

Category

_ _

Profile Type

Creator
profile-insta

WIRED Instagram Profile Statistics

Where tomorrow is realized.

Followers

1.22 M

Views

9.76 M

Media

4.78 K


Videos
  • thumbnail

  • thumbnail

  • thumbnail

  • thumbnail

  • thumbnail

  • thumbnail

  • thumbnail

  • thumbnail

  • thumbnail

  • thumbnail

  • thumbnail

  • thumbnail

View this post on Instagram

"What if most rich assholes are made, not born? What if the cold-heartedness so often associated with the upper crust—let's call it Rich Asshole Syndrome—isn’t the result of having been raised by a parade of resentful nannies, too many sailing lessons, or repeated caviar overdoses, but the compounded disappointment of being lucky but still feeling unfulfilled? We’re told that those with the most toys are winning, that money represents points on the scoreboard of life. But what if that tired story is just another facet of a scam in which we’re all getting ripped off?" - "The Spanish word aislar means both “to insulate” and “to isolate,” which is what most of us do when we get more money. We buy a car so we can stop taking the bus. We move out of the apartment with all those noisy neighbors into a house behind a wall. We stay in expensive, quiet hotels rather than the funky guest houses we used to frequent. We use money to insulate ourselves from the risk, noise, inconvenience. But the insulation comes at the price of isolation. Our comfort requires that we cut ourselves off from chance encounters, new music, unfamiliar laughter, fresh air, and random interaction with strangers. Researchers have concluded again and again that the single most reliable predictor of happiness is feeling embedded in a community. In the 1920s, around 5 percent of Americans lived alone. Today, more than a quarter do—the highest levels ever, according to the Census Bureau. Meanwhile, the use of antidepressants has increased over 400 percent in just the past 20 years, and abuse of pain medication is a growing epidemic. Correlation doesn’t prove causation, but those trends aren’t unrelated. Maybe it’s time to ask some impertinent questions about formerly unquestionable aspirations, such as comfort, wealth, and power." - Excerpted from "Civilized to Death: The Price of Progress", by Christopher Ryan. Click the link in our bio to read more. 🎨 @case_chin

A post shared by WIRED (@wired) on

View this post on Instagram

Dave Willner helped put together Facebook's content standards over a decade ago. He's not happy with the company's exceptions for politicians. - Let's back up. Last Tuesday, Facebook vice president Nick Clegg announced that Facebook was going to give politicians more leeway than other users in using offensive speech, and their assertions would not be fact-checked. That set Dave Willner over the edge. Two nights later, Willner posted a long explanation—on Facebook, of course—attacking the policy. The 35-year-old tech worker described the social network’s new stance as “foolish, wrong, and a significant betrayal of the original democratizing ideals of Facebook.” - Though Facebook says it will still remove content from politicians that encourages violence or harm, Willner argues that allowing hate speech—whether it's from a politician or a private citizen white supremacist—can create a dangerous atmosphere. He cites research from the Dangerous Speech Project, which studies the types of public speech that spark violence, that backs up his claim. He also charges that Facebook’s exception now makes politicians a privileged class, enjoying rights denied to everyone else on the platform. Not only is Facebook avoiding hard choices, Willner says, it is betraying the safety of its users to placate the politicians who have threatened to regulate or even break up the company. “Restricting the speech of idiot 14-year-old trolls while allowing the President to say the same thing isn't virtue,” writes Willner. “It's cowardice.” - Click the link in our bio to read more about how Facebook has tried to develop its content standards. 🎨 @elacey_creative

A post shared by WIRED (@wired) on

 2934

64

Upload

2019-10-13

The above data represents video analysis and stats of WIRED Instagram Profile